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North Georgia/Chattanooga Disc Golf Trip: Part II

Posted by randomtiz


Welcome back to Part II of my 4-part blog series covering our North Georgia & Chattanooga, Tennessee disc golf trip during this past MLK weekend. Good times were had at Heritage Point DGC which was our first stop. If you missed out on that article, you can read it here. Our next stop on the trip was a beautiful drive up into the mountains further into the northwest corner of Georgia.

Cloudland Canyon State Park (Lookout Mountain, GA)

Cloudland Canyon State Park is located in Lookout Mountain, GA and was about an hour’s drive from Heritage Point. We actually had to drive up through parts of Chattanooga and then back down around the mountain to get there. From Chattanooga, you take I-24W to I-59S to Trenton. The actual drive up the mountain was the more scenic than the park itself. It would be quite a beautiful drive up in the Fall. I guess I was expecting somewhat more “grandiose” scenic views from the top where the park was, but it fell short in that department. There were some elevation changes along the course, but by no means was it situated on the side of the mountain or anything. I would rate the course as more of a “family-friendly” course with all of its shorter, open fairways and only a handful of pin positions in the woods. It was by far the easiest of the four courses we played though, so it made for a laid-back casual round. It was a fun course because the shorter holes made for several good Ace-runs for us and the few long, wide open fairways were great for ripping those long bombs.

Cloudland Canyon’s course is a full 18-hole with distances ranging from 190′-347′. The total distance on the course is 4585 ft with a par of 54. The state park entry fee is $5/per car and then roughly $4/per player to use the course. *For those that live within the surrounding area or plan to play it often might want to opt for their $25 annual pass. The Visitor Center located near the entrance to the park is where you pay-to-play and can purchase discs. In the Visitor Center, they do sell a variety of Innova Pro/Champion custom-stamped Cloudland Canyon discs. You can play for FREE if you buy any of their discs! TIP: If you’re going to buy a disc, buy it before you try to pay for the round. They won’t credit you a free play for purchasing a disc if you’ve already payed to play…found that out the hard way haha (Daniel).

Hole #1 Teebox

Hole #1 Teebox

The first hole is actually the longest at 347′. It’s a fairly wide open fairway with a tall, skinny signal tower (see pic above) that’s slightly offset from the middle of the fairway. For LHBH and RHFH players, it will come into play for you. Or test your accuracy and try to fly through the triangular gaps within the tower structure. The first five holes zigzag back and forth amongst one another and butt up against the parking lot area. A 241′ Hole #2 has one of the best Ace-run chances with a slightly downward run towards the basket. Holes #3-4 bring challenging obstacles consisting of a wall of trees between you and the basket. On Hole #3 the tree wall is set a little lower down the hill (about halfway to basket) and is easier to fly over/around. Hole #4 is the shortest on the course at only 190′, but challenging. The basket sets higher on the hill and positioned directly behind a very tall set of trees. A big hyzer or scooby shot works best here as you tee off from the woodline throwing back towards the parking lot. You’re going to want a shot that’s going to come it hot, fast and at a angle that will stick the landing beyond the trees. Or…you could just test your luck and throw straight at the trees in hopes of breaking through. You might have a better chance during the winter for that route, but I wouldn’t recommend it; too thick and branchy.

Hole #5 was set up more for a RHBH thrower. There’s a large bush that sticks out on the left of teepad that will prevent any ideal line for lefties or righthand forehand throwers. For righties, it is a straighter, slightly downhill shot to the basket. The basket sets back at the woodline about 253′ away. Be careful here not to throw to the left of the fairway–or much further beyond basket–because it drops off significantly to a very steep incline below. A 235′ Hole #6 includes a more, unobstructed teebox area with a huge oak tree sitting in the middle of the fairway. The tree is directly in line with the teepad and the basket nestled into the woods. This hole requires a hard hyzer route around the large oak or one might could skim one low enough to stay under the overhanging limbs.

Hole #7 fairway runs parallel with the road that leads up to the disc golf parking lot area. Don’t be confused though, this is a blind, left-meathook hole. Take note of the huge rock formation setting on the rightside of the fairway along the road. That is where a gap opens in the fairway leading to the basket that you’ll want to hit. You want to at least throw past this huge rock in the air before your disc starts breaking back down towards the basket. You can’t miss this rock, it’s huge. Sitting about 250′ away, #7’s basket can be reached with a high hyzer shot around the rock and over some trees for a RHBH player.

Hole #8 is the second blind hole in a row. It’s another long, dogleg-left blind drive to the 270′ downhill basket. For RHBH, here’s your chance to rip a high hyzer shot out around the initial tree set into the open and back around. It’s windy up this high, so let the wind carry your disc high into the air and allow it to push it back towards the mountain and basket. Hole #9 is a 260′ line drive shot that hugs the tree line. Hole #10, you’re throwing out from the woodline into the wide open to an uphill basket. Wind and elevation come into play here–baskets always appear much closer than they really are. Be sure to arm up even though it’s only ~280′; it’s deceiving.

Holes #11-13 are out in the open and really give you a chance to show off your guns. Hole #11 is the second longest hole at 346′. Be mindful of the crosswinds and not let it divert your disc OB over the road on your right. The road runs parallel, very close to the fairway. However, there is a drop point further down if you happen to fly out or land in the road. Hole #12 is a 256′ shot to the basket. The hole is protected by a short row of trees with low hanging branches that create a protective canopy over the basket. It’s better to land on leftside of fairway so you’ll have a better angle putting to basket. Even straighter drives that fall short in line with the basket will provide a challenge putting opportunities with those low-hanging limbs. Some of us had to putt kneeling down.

Hole #12 approach

Hole #12 approach

Rick's Hole #13 hyzer spike

Rick’s Hole #13 hyzer spike

Hole #13 basket takes you back up the hill about 300′. The teepad is close to the woodline, so throw one long and stay right. If you get into the woodline mess, you’ll have trouble feeding one back through and could struggle to save par. #14 is a straighter ~210′ shot to a set of trees protecting a slightly nestled basket. Be sure to hit the clearing in the set of trees or at least, stay further left to leave you a nicer view of basket. My drive went right and I ended up having to skip a disc under the brush & trees to land near the basket on my approach.

The next 3 holes take you into the woods where you’ll find tighter fairways and more subtle elevation changes. Hole #17 is an uphill route through a very wooded, narrower fairway to a 232′ basket that rests barely outside of the woodline. It is positioned out in the open, but you’ll need a long, straight pull uphill to get out of the woods. Hole #18, you’re back up top with an open teebox area and tossing into woods again to the shallow-placed basket position. Overall, it’s a fun little course up on the mountain with mostly open holes and few challenging holes. Like I said, it is more of a family- and beginner-friendly course though. Great for families camping or for taking younger players. There were very few people playing when we went, which was nice so we could take our time and try other shots. It might be one to check off your list, but to me, not worth the admission time after time.

Views on #12 fairway (top) and outwards overlooking the mountain from #18 teebox.

Views on #12 fairway (top) and outwards overlooking the mountain from #18 teebox.

Photo credits: Rick M.

Missed Part I of our 4-part North Georgia/Chattanooga Series? Read Dogleg JT’s course review on Heritage Point DGC.


North Georgia/Chattanooga Disc Golf Trip: Part I

Posted by randomtiz


Wednesday is here, and you know what that means… Well Hump Day, yes. But that mean’s a disc golf weekend is closer in view. MLK weekend, a couple friends and I went on a weekend disc golf road trip up through North Georgia and the Chattanooga area for one of the guy’s 30th Birthdays. Along the way we crossed four courses off our lists starting with Heritage Point Park (Dalton, GA), Cloudland Canyon State Park (Lookout Mountain, GA), Sticky Pines (Ooltewah, TN) and The Sinks (Chattanooga)!

We’re at the start of February in 2016, and I’ve already crossed off five disc golf courses that I’ve never played before. With a lil one on the way (less than a month!), I’m trying to cram in as much disc golf as I physically can (or at least as much as the wifey will let me these next few weeks) haha. So to celebrate Rick’s 30th—and I guess, my last hoorah—they guys and I took off for the mountains for the weekend to hit up several courses along the way to our final destination in Chattanooga. We dubbed the trip “Mahan Mayhem” after Rick and I designed a custom print mini to commemorate the wild weekend. We had my design printed on a mini for each of the guys that went (Standard for trips of ours haha).12507547_10153953981979658_355307784037450490_n

Our goal was to hit two courses a day during our 2-day trip. We had researched parks along the way and chose the ones that higher rated via DgCourseReview.com that were on our route. I have gathered several pics from our trip and will showcase those below as I briefly discuss each course we played.

With so much to cover for each course, I’m going to break this up into a four-part series with each post dedicated to each course. I don’t want to overwhelm you guys with a daunting, seemingly infinite scroll of course coverage, pics, and who knows what else [I’m currently sippin’ a Funky Buddha Sweet Potato Casserole Strong Ale so there’s no telling how this will go. Don’t knock it ’til you try it. It’s actually pretty good by itself.]

DAY 1: North Georgia

Heritage Point Park (Dalton, GA)

Only a little over an hour north of us up I-75 is Heritage Point Park which would become our first stop of trip. According to DgCourseReview.com, Heritage Point is rated 3.16 built in 2009 and is a very hilly and heavily wooded mixture of 18 holes. It was a fairly tight and technical course that had lots of elevation changes. That’s what we were looking for heading into mountain territory. There is a pretty big creek that runs through the course that comes into play on 15-17. Although the morning was chilly and windy, we were left with bad course conditions considering the enormous amounts of continuous days of rain earlier that week. Much of the lower areas of the course were flooded. So it was pretty muddy and marshy to say the least. I loved the elevation changes and it was a good workout climbing up and down some of the hills going from hole to hole. It only had two holes over 300′ (305′ longest); but the tight fairways, elevation changes, and heavily wooded areas made it a challenging course to kick off the trip.

Hole #1 you’re teeing off 305′ from a slightly elevated tee box into the woods to a lower set basket. Even though the basket sets lower than the teebox, it still is on a downward sloping hill all around it. You overshoot the basket of go way off the left on your drive and you’ll find your disc setting some 100-150 ft at the bottom of the hill. Hole #2 is only 215′, but it’s a slight dogleg right and WAY up on a steep, muddy hill.

Hole #1 Approach to downhill basket.

Hole #1 Approach to downhill basket.

Hole #3 was also a pretty short hole around 200′. You have a blind drive towards the basket. The basket sets much lower than the teebox again and is positioned on another steep downward hill. This hill had a lot more trees so they were either your friend or your worst enemy depending on whether or not they stopped your disc from rolling all the way down the hill or prevented you from having a clear upshot back towards the basket.

Hole #3 Approach to even steeper downhill basket.

Hole #3 Approach to even steeper downhill basket.


Hole #3 pin location

Hole #3 pin location

Hole #4 (see next two pics) was one of the worst flooded holes on the course. The entire thing was incredibly marshy.

View from Hole #4 box. Good thing there's a dock walkway.

View from Hole #4 box. Good thing there’s a dock walkway.


Approach view to #4 basket with flooded conditions surrounding.

Approach view to #4 basket with flooded conditions surrounding.

Holes 5 and 6 were muddy as well, but at least they weren’t flooded. #5 was a slight dogleg left to a 285′ basket position. The trees were not my friend on this hole and had an unlucky run getting close to the basket. Hole #7 I redeemed by self with a high hyzer flick and parked it at the basket some 165′ away. The basket was tucked way to the left in a tight corner protected by tall brush in the front. Hole 8-10 were a bit straighter fairways. #9 teepad sets behind a set of trees that you have to split to throw uphill towards a slightly elevated basket. With me being left-handed, #10 played well for me with a stiff hyzer to a dogleg right pin position around 220′. #11 brings you out of the woods and up to the backside of the tennis courts. Here you’re throwing over an exposed sewer pipe back into the woods.

The creek was unforgiving to me on Hole #12 when I drove a beat Wahoo and that took off into an extreme anhyzer line and lost sight of it through the tees. We looked and looked but figured the creek swallowed it. The creek isn’t even that close to Hole #12 although it does run parallel to #16–which runs right next to the creek. I hated to lose that disc; that was my floater. The creek was moving so fast it would’ve been long gone by the time I reached it. Hole #13 was very tight and wooded. It was a dogleg left right around 200′ to the basket. Short hole that needed a strong hook to make the dogleg. Hole #14 was a bit longer at 250′ and had more elevation change. The teepad is positioned higher up the hill and you throw down & over a dip/low valley, across a runoff creek, and up to the basket. The next three holes follow the large creek. It gets pretty thick on the right side which acts as a pretty nice buffer between the fairway and the water. With all the rain we’d had lately, the creek was high, murky and moving rapidly. You weren’t finding anything in it.

#18 View from teepad

#18 View from teepad

#18 was a long 290′ foot hole where you teed off from an elevated tee box through a fairway valley and played up a steep hill to the basket. We had one or two throws up the hill that caught an edge and rolled all the way back down…fail. I’d love to play this course again once it really dries up. The mud and the sheer amount of flooded areas made it difficult to navigate and play. Great lil course though. If you’re up for a wooded, hilly technical course with elevation changes, you should check out Heritage Point. Great start to the trip!
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Check back later for Part II of the series!
-jt


NiteIze FlashFlight LED Disc Golf Discs Review

Posted by randomtiz


Don’t stop playing at dusk anymore. Keep your round going on into the night!

Winter is here, and for most of us, it gets dark very early. For me personally, it’s dark well before I even get off work which limits me to squeezing in a few holes during a lunch break or just weekend play. NiteIze has come out with a set of LED discs called FlashFlights that you have to check out if you’re an avid disc golfer. These are not your typical “glow” discs either that require you applying a light source to for hours on end to “charge” them up. The NiteIze FlashFlight Disc Golf Discs use patented fiber-optic array lighting that vividly illuminates the disc. Your typical glow discs only put off so much glow–you even lose sight of them on longer drives. But not anymore, these are super-bright color changing LED discs made from professional molds designed by professional players!

The color changing option cycles through 7 colors. Simply press the button on the underside a second time to lock in your color selection as the colors cycle through. Choose from Red, Purple, Blue, Aqua, Green, and White or even let it cycle infinitely. These LED discs are pretty durable from what I could tell during my testing phase as well as water-resistant. NiteIze claims the discs have approximately 20-hrs of LED runtime! The weight of the discs weights range from 169-175g althoug I didn’t see where it was actually marked anywhere on the discs.

You can buy the LED discs individually for ~$23/ea. or a 3-pk set for ~$60. Each set comes with a driver, midrange and a putter (link down below).

Now you never have to cut your round short again! These discs add a whole new challenging twist of fun to your everyday casual round! You don’t have to use these just at night either. Throwing over a water hazard and afraid you might lose sight of your disc underwater? Turn on the light and chunk it with confidence. (While not tested) You might be able to see it lit up in shallow water. I was amazed how far away you could still see them lit up in the distance. The video review doesn’t do them justice in terms of how bright they are.These discs would make a great idea for an unsanctioned 3-disc Night Round tourney (continued after the jump).

LED_front

LED_back

IMG_6127

IMG_6128

Big thanks to NiteIze for allowing us to review your new product as well as Sean for his help in the video! For more info on NiteIze FlashFlight LED Disc Golf discs, check out their site here.

What do you think? Have you tried these discs yet?

-jt


2015 Trilogy Challenge Discs Review

Posted by randomtiz


You’ve asked for it, now you have it!

Dogleg JT reviews the unreleased Westside Discs Elasto Sampo driver, Dynamic Discs Fuzion Evidence midrange and the Latitude 64 Retro Macana putter from this year’s Trilogy Challenge.


Music credits: Bensound.com

I am a LHBH thrower. If you’re watching the video, for comparison, I would consider my arm speed to be medium. If you are a power thrower, expect the discs to fly more understable. If you have slower arm speed, expect the discs to be more overstable.

Westside Elasto Sampo Driver

Stronger arms could get it to turnover, but The Westside Sampo was a bit too overstable for me. The first round we played silver-to-silver (short layout) and I maybe used the driver 2-3 times. To be honest, I didn’t give it much of a chance but I don’t see it making a spot in my bag. I have only thrown a handfull of Westside discs but have not found one I liked yet. The Elasto plastic is a flexible, almost gummy plastic that has a nice grip but can feel a bit wobbly. Not sure if it’s the best plastic for a driver when you’re trying to get a hard, tight grip.

Dynamic Discs Fuzion Evidence Midrange

The DD Evidence midrange disc I really enjoyed. It was more on the stable side but I could get it to turnover if I put enough arm speed into it and play a slight anhyzer line. I normally throw a Dynamic Discs Biofuzion Truth, so the mold and feel of the Evidence felt familiar. Although I feel the Truth is a bit more overstable, I can see breaking out the Evidence in casual rounds. The Evidence has a very comfortable grip to me.

Latitude 64° Retro Macana

The was the first Lat 64 disc that I had ever thrown. I’m typically not a fan of putters, but something about this disc really stood out to me during the Trilogy Challenge. It quickly made a spot in my permanent bag as that day I seemed to be on fire with it–at least for awhile. The Retro plastic is more of a cheaper, baseline grade of plastic but a nod to the plastics used back in the 80s–hence the name. The Retro plastic dings really easily but does have a nice grip to it. Of all three Trilogy discs, the Macana became my easy favorite.

What did you think of the discs?

To read more about the Trilogy Challenge that I participated in, be sure to check out my previous post, “2015 Trilogy Challenge – Oregon Park Recap.”
-jt


Matt Dollar’s Georgia Top Ten

Posted by randomtiz


Earlier last week, a thread started on Atlanta Disc Golf’s Facebook page where fellow members weighed in on their Top 10 favorite disc golf courses in Georgia. It was interesting to see everyone’s input and how many of the same courses were repeatedly making the lists. Most of the entries were simply just the course names, but the post that stood out to me the most was one by Loganville-local and Innova Disc Golf Pro, Matt Dollar #26045.

Since moving here to Georgia almost 5 years ago, I’ve been able to make it to and play almost 25 of the nearly 90 disc golf courses located here in the state. I am always up for playing new courses and checking them off my list. While I enjoyed reading everyone’s personal favs, Dollar’s was the one that stood out to me because his list was one of the few–if not the only–that included reasons behind each of his picks. I appreciated that. With permission from Matt, below is his post from the ADGO Facebook page.

And now my Top 10 Georgia courses and the reasons.

10. Bowden Golf Course – Macon.
It’s like no other course in Ga. You really feel like you’re in Texas. It’s hot as hades and is filled with sand, CACTI, lizards, and lots of things that poke you. I don’t ever play great there, but it’s a sick course.

09. Tom Triplett – Savannah.
With at least 2 or 3 tee pads on every hole, you have unlimited options at TTP. Hole 4 from Gold might be the best Par 5 in GA.

08. Redan – God’s Country.
This John David design is amazing. The course itself is only on about 15 acres. Some of the good old school long pins aren’t there anymore, and the key holders seem to favor the shorties. Redan is still awesome, and with PNUT raising funds for new pins, it has me excited to see some of those great pins back in the future.

07. Lake Russell – Elberton.
The other John David old school designed course on my list. Par 3 golf at it’s best. Most courses this old are getting easier with age, but LR is the exception. It keeps getting tighter and the areas that used to be tall grass back in the day are now small forests.

06. Jim Warner – IDGC.
The youngest of the IDGC courses is the squirreliest, but overall a sweet track. The back nine is a hike and features what is possibly the hardest Par 5 in GA, hole 15.

05. Perkerson – Atlanta.
John Ritger is one of the best designers there is IMO. The longtime temp course was amazing. When the permanent course finally got the green light, John had to redesign a course that everyone loved for years. That’s not an easy task and yet he came out with a great layout that pleases the masses.

04. NGCT – Lula.
Keith Johnson and John Ritger made a great design. And Keith pours his heart and soul into this place and it shows. This is the year of Lula with the GTI and 3 A Tiers. Oh, and you play through a chicken shack! Bakaaa!

03. Jackson – IDGC.
The big dog. Starts out with 6 Par fours in a row! And 3 Par Fives! Holes 3 and 12 are the only crappy holes here. Hole 17 is one of the hardest Par Fours in GA. Holes 8 and and 10 are sick.

02. JP Moseley – Stockbridge.
The course that has it all. Short, long, wooded, open, easy, hard, and a Skull Island. I haven’t played the news holes, but the original 18 is one of the best ever. The 3 Par Fives are sick. And The last five holes are like playing Lake Russell.

01. Steady Ed – IDGC.
The easiest course at the IDGC is also the most fun, and also the most valid. It’s super fun in the short pins and in the longs. Long arms get eagle chances on several holes on the long layout. Hole 5 is one of the coolest holes in GA when the lake is up. I could play Ed everyday without getting sick of it.
If Flyboy and Crucible were involved they’d be 1 and 2. Anyone who has ever played Flyboy knows it’s the best there is. Duh.

Innova Pro Matt Dollar

Innova Pro Matt Dollar

Matt’s already off to a hot start this 2015 season. He’s won the first two sanctioned tourneys he’s played in this year, Savannah Open and the IDGC Ice Bowl. So far he’s won 3 of the 7 sanctioned tourneys and had 2 more top 10 finishes. To follow Matt’s tournament journey, check out Matt Dollar #26045 PDGA.

If you have any more favorite Georgia courses, let us know by posting a comment below!
-jt


Introducing “PING”, the First Trackable Discgolf Disc

Posted by randomtiz


I don’t know how often you guys troll crowdfunding sites such as Kickstarter.com which allows backers to pledge funding to creative startup projects. These projects typically offer backers tangible rewards and/or special experiences in exchange for the pledge. Kickstarter’s a platform to help bring creative projects come to life. There is ALL kinds of clever and innovative, cool stuff on there! But back to my point, I do browse through Kickstarter’s site quite often and search for disc golf-related projects. Currently on Kickstarter, there are nearly 30 “disc golf”-related projects that show up in search results dating back to 2011. However, only one of those projects is currently active and it’s the one I really want you guys to check out. Introducing PING, the world’s first trackable disc golf disc!

Have you ever lost a disc in the woods or spent hours on end stumbling through briars and mud looking for you disc?
Well, check out the PING disc from Tobu Discs. Claiming it’s the first trackable disc, this disc has a built-in, underside compartment that states it does not affect the disc’s flight path and also completely waterproof. The disc pairs with the bluetooth on your iPhone or Android phone along with their free Tobu app. The app—specially designed for the Ping—will help lead you to locate your disc once you start walking in the direction of the thrown disc. The PING disc will automatically begin to beep and flash once it’s thrown too!

The app also lets you search for other courses in your area, view course maps using your phone’s GPS, rate courses, create/submit your own courses, track you and your friend’s scores, and even measure and record the distance of your throw.

Ping Trackable Disc

There’s a lot more to it as well. I don’t want to spoil it here, so get over to the PING Kickstarter campaign and learn more! The project’s campaign only lasts until 3:00pm EST this coming Thursday, February 5th 2015. Pledge them!

Visit their Kickstarter: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2015374999/ping-trackable-disc-golf-disc

Visit their website: www.tobudiscs.com

-jt


Custom Zipper Pulls with an Edge!

Posted by randomtiz


Custom zipper pulls make zipping/unzipping pockets a breeze, with a unique twist! Thanks to Gone Discin Paracords, you can stylize your disc golf bags and backpacks zippers with an edgy, custom flare! These things rock!

Custom-made "Cobra" Zipper Pulls with Spikes from Gone Discin Paracords

Custom-made “Cobra” Zipper Pulls with Spikes from Gone Discin Paracords

[backstory]
If you’re like me, I love backpacks. But not just any backpack, I like backpacks with as many compartments and pouches as imaginable. Regardless of what I’m using the backpack for, I like having lots of storage knowing that I can store anything and everything I deem necessary to tote around with me. I like being prepared–prepared for any unexpected potential situation. Especially when it comes to disc golf and being outdoors. Aside from carrying all of my discs, minis, pens, towels, etc…I also like carrying essential camping/emergency accessories such as a flashlight, knife, paracord, drybags, band-aids, matches and an assortment of other stuff when I go play disc golf. Hey, you never know.

This leads me to my modified disc golf backpack that I use now. I wasn’t satisfied with a lot of the current designs and the associated hefty price tags that come with a lot of the pro disc golf backpacks out on the market today. I just couldn’t justify paying nearly $150 for a pro bag that had the adequate amount of storage space/pockets I needed when I could potentially modify my own for a fraction of the cost. So I browsed for weeks for a low price point bag that had enough pockets and compartments that suited my needs. I finally found one to hold everything that I could possibly want to carry along with me in my disc golf bag. I wanted it to almost be like a disc golf/survival backpack. I bought a FUL backpack on clearance for less than $15 that had ample storage and had a bicycle helment pouch attached to the front. A bicycle helmet pouch you ask? Yes, it would serve as a loose, quick-access pouch that was perfect for holding my 3 go-to discs. I even went as far as to build a custom PVC exterior frame for the bag to give it enough support to stand upright. But I digress.

So with that many zippered pockets on my new bag, I had to find a better way to keep track of where everything was stashed and which pockets I accessed the most each round. Discs make up three of the pockets and others house things like snacks or emergency stuff that don’t necessarily get pulled out or used on a round-to-round basis. For those of you that have played with me before, know that I like to play speedy rounds. I have to be able to grab discs quickly and efficiently. I found myself quite often fumbling with all the zippers trying to find the correct zipper to the correct pocket. It can get frustrating–especially when it’s super cold out and your fingers are numb.

So how do I keep track of where everything is? How do I quickly find what I’m looking for or where the most important pockets are? Well it’s a heckuva lot easier now that I’ve added custom-made zipper pulls from Gone Discin Paracords to those main pockets!

From hole to hole, it’s a breeze to quickly find the correct zippers to pull open and grab discs. And you know how difficult and cumbersome it can be reaching for those dang little zippers. But guess what, it shouldn’t have to be anymore. Welcome to Gone Discin Paracords custom-made zipper pulls. Add these badass, wicked little zipper pulls for quick access to those pesky minuscule zippers!photo4

Steve and Lindsay Wilmoth are the owners of the small Michigan business, Gone Discin Paracords. They are gracious and super nice! Please check out their Facebook page to see a variety of their zipper pull designs. Be sure to notice the double helix and the DNA knot ones too, they look sweeeet! Steve and Lindsay do completely custom orders to suit your needs.

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These high-quality, durable zipper pulls and sets make great giveaways for tourneys or your club. The set I have shown here in the pics is the “Cobra” Set with skulls and spikes. I haven’t added all the pulls onto my bag yet, but the set comes with 6 pulls, birdie beads, and a bag tag/towel holder! You can select from 5 designs and nearly 30+ colors. Don’t like the skulls? Get the beads instead. Imagine the combination possibilities!

Still looking for Christmas gift ideas? These zipper pulls can also make great gifts or stocking stuffers (there’s still time)! Actually, this month they’re even running a special sale so grab the deal while it lasts!

[from their Facebook page]

December $ale of the month!!!!

Full Sets will be $15 Shipped on all designs! Includes 6 pulls, Birdie Beads, Bag Tag Holder, and FREE Towel Holder

  • $1 pulls for all designs. (30+ colors) (5 Designs)
  • $4 Birdie Beads with beads or skulls.
  • $2 Bag Tag Holders.
  • $2 Towel Holders.
  • Shipping Starts at $3
  • 50% off customization including Spikes Available in Cobra only, Numbers/Letters Available in Cobra, DNA, and Double Helix.

Visit Gone Discin Paracords on Facebook.
-jt


Gear Review: Putter BeadZ

Posted by Tricia Lafferty


If you ask almost any player what their least favorite part and weakest part of their Disc Golf game is, the answer is usually putting. Putting is the part of the game where you actually score, and can drastically raise or lower your score. If you are a consistent and accurate putter, your scores can drop drastically. If you’re like me, you’re still inconsistent and need a lot of work on that part of the game. The only way to get better at putting is to practice it. A tweak in thumb placement, release point, grip, and technique can make a difference, but you will only know if you practice. Putting needs to become automatic, and over thinking creates mistakes. IMG_1156

So how do you practice? I tried a few methods, and what seems to work best for me is starting close, and gradually moving back. I used to take a measuring reel out and put flags down at certain distances, and putt inside the circle. This was a pain doing it every time I went out, and when I wanted to move the basket to a different location. My yard has some hills and different terrain, so it’s great for practicing uphill and downhill putts.

Problem solved! Megan Ramsey who does Disc-Lexia Disc Golf Art came up with a great product for putting practice called Putter Beadz! Putter Beadz are circle’s length (10 meters) cord with beads placed every foot. Every 5 feet has a distinguishing bead as well. Now when I go out to practice, I can place the basket down, loop the Putter BeadZ cord around the pole, pull the cord out to length, stake it down and I’m ready to go! IMG_1143

I usually start out on the level ground, and start at 10 feet back with a stack of 5 putters. If I make all 5 putts, I move back another 5 feet. If I make all of those putts, then I move back again. If I miss even just 1 of those putts, I move back up. This is an easy way to identify the distance where you are making all of your putts, and where you are getting inconsistent. When I first started using the Putter BeadZ, I was inconsistent starting at 15 feet. Now that I have been using them for awhile, I am pushing out to about 25 feet. I can work in foot increments on my trouble areas. IMG_1144

With the Putter BeadZ, I know where I am at distance wise but visual, and by actual footage. This translates on the course when you walk up to the basket, your brain registers how far you are away, and how hard to throw. This helps great a relation between visual recognition and muscle memory.

The best thing about having the Putter BeadZ is I can move the basket easily onto a hill, pull the string out and stake it down, and then putt uphil or downhill in the same manner. On downhill putts I was overshooting the basket a lot. Now that I have had practice using the Putter BeadZ, I am sinking those putts that used to sail over the top of the basket. Same with uphill shots, I was hitting the cage a lot, now I bring my release point up further based on the grade of the hill and distance. IMG_1145

Overall, using the Putter BeadZ has made me a more confident putter, as well as a better one. Since I can easily move the basket and string around, I am more likely to actually move it and practice all of the variations. It has saved a lot of time as well not having to measure and flag every time I go out, or move the basket.

Putter BeadZ come in a lot of different colors and varations! Hit up the Facebook page to see photos of all the options that are offered. You may also email Megan directly to place your order at disclexiadgart@yahoo.com
Facebook:
Putter BeadZ

Also check out Megan’s awesome art work!
Facebook:
Disc-Lexia Disc Golf Art (more…)


Review: ROA Tournament Bag by FOSSA Disc Golf

Posted by mleefry


One of my favorite things about disc golf is witnessing innovation that comes along with a growing sport. Nothing makes me more optimistic about disc golf than listening to people like DGnomad founder Jeff Gradinger or Legends World Champion and founder of Hott Shotts Pete May as they discuss their creative ideas for making disc golf a household name. A few months ago, I had the pleasure of playing a round with Parker Asay, one of the dedicated idea guys behind FOSSA Disc Golf, a new LLC based out of Springfield, Mo. Southern Missouri may be a surprising home for disc golf growth. In addition to FOSSA, Springfield is home to the first ever disc golf course in Missouri, as well as Disc Golf Monkey, a retailer known mostly for their colorful and heavy-duty Monkey Trap baskets. The Journey Post shop and Treehouz course, home of the Journey Post First Stop, is located just south of Springfield.

Needless to say, it’s not surprising to see a product like the ROA Tournament Bag come from this area.

The ROA Tournament Bag is comparable to the Innova DISCarrier. It holds 25+ discs, has several pockets and three dividers for organized storage, and an end pocket for putters. The bag is made of 600D PVC coated nylon; for those like me who know nothing about textiles, this translates to “waterproof and super durable.”

FOSSA

This being my first opportunity to really review a disc golf bag, I was surprised at how detail-oriented Asay was. He pointed out to me how the seams were stitched in such a way to add to the bag’s durability. On the lowest part of the back of the ROA, there are Velcro loops to secure a golf umbrella. FOSSA’s website is serious when the claim is made that they’re “committed to making products that are perfect for the everyday golfer.” Throughout our round, he continued to ask for my feedback and the feedback from others on the course in order to improve the product.

Even the name of the bag is clever and shows their dedication to perfection. The company’s name, FOSSA, is the name of the cat-like top predator of Madagascar. “Roa” is the Malagasy word meaning “two,” because FOSSA’s initial bag design underwent so many improvements that this bag became the second.

Now, the part you’ve all been waiting for…let’s talk money. The FOSSA bag retails for $59.99. Yes, that is not a typo. Not a sale price. $59.99. For comparison, the Innova DISCarrier is $79.99 on their website.

But it takes more than price to determine if a product is the right fit. As fascinated as I am by the FOSSA bag, I know that it would not yet be the best bag for me. As a beginning disc golfer, I carry 13 discs on average, which only makes up half of the ROA Tournament Bag’s disc storage. In order for the bag to not sink in the middle, I had to add extra discs for the round. That being said, having too much storage is typically not an avid disc golfer’s problem. For anyone who carries enough discs and is not ready to make the financial commitment to a backpack bag (like the Grip A14, which runs $259), the ROA is definitely the way to go. I would also recommend upgrading the bag with backpack straps to add a little more comfort and support—I used the ROA strap for 9 holes and my Phoenix straps for the other 9 for the sake of testing both out.

For more information or to order the ROA Tournament Bag, check out FOSSA’s website http://fossadiscgolf.com, like them on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/fossadiscgolf, or ask your local disc golf retailer.


The Flight Analyzer releases for Android

Posted by Bobby Hoellwarth


The Flight Analyzer [ FlightAnalyzer.com ], the web’s original interactive visual disc route comparison tool, has been released for Android devices.  Compare flight routes easily by selecting a type of disc (Putter, Mid-Range, Fairway, Distance), then a manufacturer, and finally a model of disc.  It can be downloaded for free on the Google Play Store here:
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.discmouse.flightanalyzer&hl=en
Or by searching for Flight Analyzer on the Google Play Store on your Android device.

Like the website, the Flight Analyzer app allows users to compare anywhere from 3 discs to an infinite number of discs side-by-side (although your device may lag after a hundred or so).  The app has the following features:

  • compare discs with no internet connection (not available on the website version)
  • load 3 discs and add any number of additional discs
  • switch between Left and Right handed
  • select Metric, Imperial, or both measurements
  • adjust flight route based on throwing speed (MA3, MA2, MA1, MPO)

Advantage of the app: you can compare disc flights while out on those hard to reach courses with no internet

Disadvantage of the app: if you load a lot of discs (like your whole bag), there is currently no way to save them like you can on the site, so they will be gone when you close the app and open it again.

Future plans for the app include adding save functionality and releasing the app for iOS.

Flight Analyzer


Missouri Winter Wonderland

Posted by mleefry


Hey Dogleggers, long time no talk!  I promise I haven’t forgotten about you guys—I actually daydream about blogging quite often.  For those who don’t know, I’m currently in my junior year of college, so let’s just say that I have to write a lot of stuff that’s not about disc golf during the school year and my brain can only produce so many words in a week.

Anyway, I’ve been DYING to tell you guys a little bit about the crazy winter we’ve been having here in Missouri.  It’s been a winter wonderland.  Not “wonderland” like the deep snow and beautiful trees on a Christmas card—we’re not quite northern enough for that.  I mean WONDERland, like “I wonder if it’s going to be 60 and sunny, or if it’s going to be so cold the news anchors are telling me not to let my dog outside for more than 10 minutes.”  So, let’s take a look at Missouri’s last few weekends.

Four weeks ago today I played in the 28th Annual Ice Bowl in Columbia, Mo.  Columbia is not only my hometown, but the home of the original Ice Bowl in 1987.  As we all know, the official Ice Bowl slogan is “No Wimps, No Whiners,” and for the 28th Annual there was nothing to complain about.  The weather was beautiful, in the 40s and no rain or snow.  I was very happy to be able to play in a division of 5 women, two of us celebrating one year since our first tournament!  On top of that, I shot my personal record on the Oakland Top course with a 2 stroke improvement.  It was a wonderful day!

Five ladies competed in the women's division at the 28th Annual Ice Bowl in Columbia, Mo.

Five ladies competed in the women’s division at the 28th Annual Ice Bowl in Columbia, Mo.

Ice Bowl Shirt

Winners of each division at the 28th Annual Ice Bowl in Columbia, Mo.

Winners of each division at the 28th Annual Ice Bowl in Columbia, Mo.

After such a great experience at the Columbia Ice Bowl, I was really pumped to play the following weekend in Jefferson City, Mo.  However, the night before the tournament there was an ice storm and it wasn’t safe to make the 30 minute drive.  Instead, I spent the day playing a 4-hole NOMAD course at my house and gathering with my neighbors to scrape ice off of my street.  Not so wonderful.

NOMAD target set up in my backyard while it was too icy to drive to a course safely.

NOMAD target set up in my backyard while it was too icy to drive to a course safely.

My street covered in ice, and everyone trying to clear it off.

My street covered in ice, and everyone trying to clear it off.

 

I didn’t get any golf in the following weekend.  There was more snow and I turned 21, so I think you can infer that I was a little busy doing other things…

Final Birthday

Last weekend I finally made my way down to Jefferson City to play league at their new course.  They still don’t have permanent baskets or tee pads installed, so we played the front nine twice with temp baskets.  Just by looking at the front nine and hearing rumors about the back nine, this course is going to be a BEAST.  There are a few water hazards, lots of elevation change, and a mix of tight tunnels and long fairway shots that have to be strategically placed.  (It’ll definitely be worthy of a course guide when it’s finished.)

Although it only snowed a little while I was there, there was plenty of “leftover” snow on the ground, cause it hadn’t been above freezing in at least a week.  The park’s namesake Binder Lake was frozen enough to walk on (although I never recommend walking on ice!), which is pretty rare.

During this round my winter weakness was particularly evident.  I’m usually pretty good at not letting cold affect my mental game, keeping my throwing hand warm, and not letting my feet get wet.  But the worst thing about winter disc golf is wearing so many layers that it limits my range of motion.  For the most part it doesn’t impact my driving, but trying to follow through on a putt when I feel like the Michelin Man is just not going to happen.

Geese on the shore of Binder Lake in Jefferson City, Mo., near their newest course.

Geese on the shore of Binder Lake in Jefferson City, Mo., near their newest course.

One of my drives at the new course in Binder Lake Park

One of my drives at the new course in Binder Lake Park

Jefferson City Disc Golf Club's President Stan Balke putting from a tree on the new course

Jefferson City Disc Golf Club’s President Stan Balke putting from a tree on the new course

Just six days later, I played my first short-sleeved round of the year at Carrollton Park in St. Louis.  It was a beautiful, sunny day reaching a high of nearly 60 degrees.  Can you say complete weather 180!?  Then, fast forward to today, when the high is expected to be only 38 degrees; my disc golf feat for the day will only consist of writing this post and wishing I were at the Gentlemen’s Club Challenge, where it is currently 65 and sunny!

Precarious basket at Carrollton Park in Bridgeton, Mo., a suburb of St. Louis.

Precarious basket at Carrollton Park in Bridgeton, Mo., a suburb of St. Louis.


The “Towch” Review by Dogleg JT

Posted by randomtiz


As the end to Valentine’s Day Weekend draws near, I would like to share with you guys a new love that’s in the air. Something that I hope you guys will end up loving as much as I have.

A few weeks ago I was searching for a new towel to clip onto my disc golf bag. I stumbled across this thing called the “Towch®” and was like whaaaaaaaat? Weird name, right? This was something unlike I had ever seen or heard of before. For those of you that know me, I am huge proponent and fan of new technology—especially when it relates to disc golf.

Towch1

It’s Called a…What Now?:
What exactly is the Towch® you might ask? Well let me tell you. The Towch® is a pouch that also doubles as a towel. Before I dive too much further into the review, I’d rather you watch the video review we put together. Watch the video below and see the Towch® in action!

*If the video does not load, click here to view it on YouTube!

How it Works:
1) Using the 2 carabiner clips, attach to your belt loops, belt or bag.
2) Insert 3-5 discs to use as a carrying pouch.
3) Insert 1 disc and spin the disc around within the pouch to dry it off or to remove dirt/mud.

Final Thoughts:
This thing has so many different uses! Lately I’ve found myself using it more as a putter carrier attached to my belt loops. I haven’t had 5 discs maxed out in it yet while playing, so not sure if it affects my throwing. But 1-3 discs do not affect my throw. I like keeping my putter(s) in there for super quick access for putting. This would be a great solution for frolfers that only carry a handful of discs anyway.

During this cold spell these past few weeks, I’ve found myself even using it as a handwarmer pouch. Put a “Hot Hands” packet in there and keep that throwing hand warm! You could also use it to carry snacks, maybe a cold drink or two, camera, etc. Hahha or even use it as a hat to keep your head and ears warms! (See me being ridiculous towards the end of the video where I demonstrate the hat use). Possibilities are endless!

Get this, they’re 100% made in the USA! That’s awesome.

I want one! Where can I buy one?:
Please visit their site at TowelPouch.com to learn more! Towches® currently come in a variety of 8 colors. The standard, one-color Towch® has an MSRP of $11.99. Be sure to “like” their FB page at www.facebook.com/TheTowch! Mention you read the Towch® review on DoglegDiscGolf.com.

Share the Towch® love this Valentine’s!
-jt


the blog: doglegdiscgolf.com
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Kickstarting a DG Following

Posted by randomtiz


According to the “Disc Golf and PDGA Demographics” article on PDGA’s website, last year there were an estimated 500+ thousand regular disc golf players in the world. Disc golf is rapidly growing at a significant rate every year. And it can grow at an even more substantial rate with the help of the hundreds of thousands—if not millions—disc golfers all over the world. We, as a disc golf community, have to back and support our fellow disc golfers and companies looking to improve and expand the sport. Look how far disc golf has grown just in the past 10 years, for example. It is astonishing to me. Whether it’s a new type of disc technology, a new disc retriever, a rolling disc golf cart that houses everything but the kitchen sink, or even a new disc golf app that lets you—right from your living room couch—flick discs into those sweet chain sounds we’ve learned to love, there are numerous projects out there that can have an impact on disc golf.

One place I’ve found to help support and hopefully “kick start” a fellow disc golfer’s dream is Kickstarter.com. If you guys aren’t familiar with Kickstarter, check it out—it may have more appeal to you than one might think. Ok, so Kickstarter started back in 2009 and is a community of both big and small projects that are “brought to life through the direct support” of people like us. “Project creators set a funding goal and deadline. If people like a project, they can pledge money to make it happen. “ With over 52,000 projects listed since its launch in 2009, there have only been around 16—that I’ve found—to be disc golf related. Funding is all or nothing with these campaigns, soif the projects do not reach their goal, no funding is allocated. It is a really low risk form of investment for people looking to support creative projects, and the incentives that are created for Kickstarter backers are often very cool and can only be had by backing a project.

Lets take a moment and review a few of these. After recent research of the disc golf Kickstarter projects that I could find listed on the site, there were only a few that I felt were truly unique and worthy enough to mention. I will start by commenting on the very first disc golf project I could find, the “carbon disc” by Tyler Seamons. The “carbon disc” was a disc driver prototype made from Carbon Fiber with a heavy-duty polyurethane plastic protective edge. Sounded like it would have been pretty cool—something that sturdy and could take a beating—but I doubt it would have ever be approved by the PDGA. It raised over $4400 of its $7500 funding goal.

Then a few projects later there was “Chains the Movie: The First Disc Golf Documentary” launched by pro disc golfer Avery Jenkins back in 2011. “Chains” was to be the first definitive disc golf documentary featuring pros from all over the world in hopes of bringing the sport to the mainstream. Although nearly $20k short of the funding goal, it still raised over $6k. If I had known about this project and Kickstarter years ago, I would have for sure pledged some bucks their way! I’ve always been a fan of Avery’s—not to mention he’s a subscriber of our blog too.

There are several other neat ideas such as the Walkadisc and Six Shooter disc holsters, but I’m not sure how those would work with big spin drives. Then there’s a handful of “wtf” projects that leave you wondering if it was a joke or if these people were actually serious? Regardless, only 1 of these 16 disc golf Kickstarter projects was successful by meeting its funding goal.

Why weren’t more of these successful? Was the proposed budget goal too high? Is there not enough current support in the disc golf community? Does the disc golf community even know about these efforts? Or it could just be a flawed concept to begin with. I won’t get into that now—my sole intent here is to raise awareness to new disc golf initiatives and encourage this ever-growing disc golf community for their support. If you feel like these new projects, companies, and apps present a strong concept, please support them! Just think, what if a project that you actually helped fund, made it all the way to completion!

DiscGolfUnchained-Logo-Light

This leads me to my final topic. The latest disc golf project to hit Kickstarter that needs your help and support! The “Disc Golf Unchained” campaign by Local Route Labs is the latest disc golf video game app project. Check it out here on Kickstarter and on their website, Local Route Labs for more info.

I was excited to see the “Disc Golf Unchained” gameplay featured in the video above put out by Local Route Labs. The graphics and environment felt very realistic compared to any other disc golf game app that I have come across. It’s awesome to see the progress and where disc golf video gaming has come so far. After reading about the project on both their website and Kickstarter, I was itching to know more! I was able to get in touch with Local Route Labs’ co-founder, Tyler Krucas, to learn more about the project. Here’s what Tyler had to say:

“Local Route Labs is proud to introduce Disc Golf Unchained, the most realistic and engaging disc golf video game in development. Disc Golf Unchained is a video game by disc golfers for disc golfers. We want Disc Golf Unchained to satisfy both the casual and hardcore player, hopefully steering new people into disc golf. The game looks to capture the excitement and experience of throwing the perfect shot and bring it to the palm of your hand. We attempted to create realistic flight physics and course environments that, along with a complex player progression system, offer a fun and immersive game anyone can enjoy, just like actual disc golf.

The game is slated for release on Android and iOS sometime in 2014, and we have developed an extremely intuitive touch interface for the game on these platforms. Although we intend to initially release Disc Golf Unchained on mobile devices, advancements in human interface technology and online networks for next-gen consoles have us thinking about the full potential of disc golf in the virtual world. Imagine throwing a round with or against your friends at your beautiful local course, but from the comfort of your respective living rooms! The prospects for Disc Golf Unchained are very bright.”

This is where the guys at Local Route Labs and “Disc Golf Unchained” need your help. With ONLY 7 DAYS (ends Dec. 3rd) to go with their Kickstarter campaign, they have already raised over $5500 but still have a good ways to go. Please check out the campaign where you can read more on the project, watch their video, and if you like, pledge money! There are different pledge levels starting as low as donating $1. Each pledge level gets you more swag as the pledge amount increases. It’s pretty cool how it works!

I’m very excited about “Disc Golf Unchained” and can’t wait to hopefully see it in the App Store and Google Play Store soon! Even better, I hope it makes it to a gaming console in the near future. Lets put the “fun” in funding and go support your fellow disc golf community—I just did!

-jt


For more info on the “Disc Golf Unchained” project, check out the following links:
“Disc Golf Unchained” Kickstarter campaign
Local Route Labs
Local Route Labs on Facebook


Vibram O-Lace Disc Video Review

Posted by destinjames


Yesterday my wife Jessica and I enjoyed a perfect sunny 60 degree Disc Golf round together, and we were able to film a disc review for the new Vibram O-Lace, coming out November 14th.

Enjoy this Dogleg Disc Review! Just click the blue link.

Filmed by my wonderful wife Jessica. I think she’s officially a Doglegger now! 🙂

If the video above doesn’t show, click Dogleg Disc Golf Presents: The Vibram O-Lace Disc Review

(For full HD, make sure your YouTube viewer setting is on 720p)


Retrieve Discs Easily and Safely with DiscGator!

Posted by randomtiz


I recently was able to get my hands on a DiscGator disc retriever prototype. I was enthusiastic about receiving it in the mail after all the positive things I had read about it a few weeks prior. Could this finally be my solution for grabbing discs out of heavy brush and debris-filled ponds? I was about to soon find out.

A brief backstory. A few years ago I was introduced to the Golden Disc Retriever [review here]. To say the least, I was not a slight bit impressed with it. It was hard to aim and was completely useless in ponds with heavy submerged plants or either you couldn’t see your disc. It seemed to only be effective in water hazards with smooth bottom surfaces where you could actually see the disc underwater. Anyways, if you want to read that review to compare it with the DiscGator, by all means.

Out of the Bag:

The DiscGator comes in a pull-cord 24″ mesh bag. Inside the mesh bag is the telescopic pole that can extend to nearly 5-ft. Also included is the clamp—the second main element to the DiscGator. The clamp is what will screw onto the end of the telescopic pole. The mesh bag also comes with two aluminum clasp hooks which make it easy to snap to the outside of your disc golf bag. discgator1

They’re easily removable as well if you need to expand the width between the two to fit your bag accordingly. One thing I wish–or hope–the final version will have is for some way for the clamp to attach (or hang) from the pole when not in use. The pole itself condenses down to 24″. But this leaves you with the big clamp hanging outside of the mesh bag. May not be an issue for most, but could become cumbersome if you’re constantly swinging your bag on/off your shoulder.
Attaches nicely to the straps on your bag!

Attaches nicely to disc golf bag’s straps!

*Keep in mind this is the prototype, so some “flaws” might be fixed on the final version of the DiscGator.

How it Works:
1) Remove the DiscGator from the mesh bag.
2) Screw on the clamp to end of the telescopic pole.
3) Untwist the telescopic pole to extend to full length.
4) Place the trigger hook into the notched position.
5) Reach for edge of disc and align with DiscGator’s clamp.
6) Once edge of disc is between the clamps fingers, jab forward to trigger.
7) Chomp! You got it.

The DiscGator Gets Put to the Test:
Watch the video below to see the Dogleg crew test out the DiscGator in streams, heavy brush, trees, ponds and deep ditches. See for yourself just how easy it is.

*If the video does not load, click here to watch the DiscGator in action!

Final Thoughts:
In a completely unbiased opinion, the DiscGator is BY FAR the most convenient, practical, versatile and “best worth your investment” product that I have reviewed here to date on the blog. As far as retrievals, it has yet to fail me. If you and your buddy both have one, combine both telescopic poles to one another to get over 10-ft of length! This will really allow you to reach further into a tree or out into the water.

It has exceeded my expectations and I can’t believe how simple the concept is. It’s amazing. Like I mentioned earlier, the only minor flaw I saw is that I wish there was a better way for the clamp part to attach to the mesh bag (or if the mesh bag had a separate pocket) when not in use. Now I’m having to keep the clamp in my side drink pocket of my bag—which means I can’t fit my tasty beverage of choice =P. Another minor issue that Dogleg Destin encountered was with the clamp on his DiscGator. He mentioned that the trigger seemed a bit stiff—to where it took a slightly harder jab at the disc to release the trigger mechanism. He was going to try to loosen the tightening screw a little to see if that would help.

All in all, this DiscGator is well worth the investment. Think about how many discs you can save/retrieve and never have to get wet, dirty, scratched or even have to come into contact with Poison Ivy or other such poisonous plants. According to their website, DiscGator.com, they hope the DiscGator will be available for nationwide sales by early 2014. I can’t wait to see how the final version will turn out. If I’m that amazed by the prototype, I can only imagine. Here’s to a well-designed product, Now Go Get Chompin’!

Please share this post!
-jt


the blog: doglegdiscgolf.com
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Keep Your Score with ScoreBand!

Posted by randomtiz


What do you keep track of your disc golf scores with?

Do you find yourself fumbling through your disc golf bag in search for that dang pencil or constantly pulling out your smartphone after each hole to keep track of your scores?

Well what if I told you that there is a much easier, and simpler way to keep up with your scores? There is, and I was fortunate enough to come across it via Women’s Pro Disc Golfer/Model Holly Finley on Twitter. It’s called the ScoreBand®.

The ScoreBand® is a slick, portable, and convenient silicone wristband that allows you to track your scores in three different modes! Not only is it a watch too, ScoreBand® has a Tennis mode, Golf mode and an All Score mode. Since I’m a disc golfer, this review will mostly go in-depth about the Golf mode because it closest relates to our sport.
Untitled-1

The Look:
IMG_1766sm
The ScoreBand® is sweat & water-resistant and made of a grippy, non-slip silicone material. Normally I’m not one to wear things upon my wrists while playing because my mindset is that I feel like they mess me up. =) But this on the other hand, is very comfortable and does not slide up and down when I throw. It has a very slim, modern design to it which I find pretty cool and stylish. It comes in two band colors (black and white) and has four button colors (green, orange, pink and grey) available to choose from—making 8 different possible color combinations. Each wristband is available in four size options from Small to X-Large as well.

Getting Started:
Ok, the ScoreBand® is very easy to use. No fancy screens. No unnecessary buttons. No wacky user interface. It’s simple. It’s functional. That’s all we’re looking for here. Great for the active person that just wants a solution to quickly track scores in a convenient manner.

On the wristband, you simply have two buttons on the face—an up and a down arrow. This is how you’ll enter your scores. First, let’s get to the mode that we’re going to use. By default, the Time (watch) mode is displayed first. To toggle through the other modes, press the silver button on the right side. If you’re a disc golfer, use the Golf mode. You know you’re in Golf mode setting when you see the small “G” in the center of the screen.

Entering Scores: GOLF Mode
You’ll use the up and down arrows to your record your throws for each hole. The top digit is your hole score while the bottom digit is your round score. For example, you make it in the basket in 3 throws on the first hole. You would tap the up arrow 3x until “3” is displayed. Now that your number of strokes is displayed on top, next hold down the down arrow for 3 seconds to “enter” that score. The entered score “3” will now show in the bottom spot as your total round score. Then say you get a “4” on Hole 2. Arrow up 4x, hold the down arrow for the 3 seconds to enter that score and you’ll notice the bottom number then changes to “7”. You get the point, right? Easy!

If you go past your number while arrowing up, just tap the down arrow to count back down. And what I like about this, is how easy it is to hit the buttons. You can still be walking & talking and not really have to pay attention to entering in the numbers—unlike trying to track it on a cellphone when you have to make sure you’re on the correct screen. You’ll be at the next teepad in no time while you’re buddy’s back there fiddling with his smartphone score tracking app. This is great for the social disc golfer.

Using the All Score Mode:
The All Score mode can be used to your advantage if you would like to track more statistics. Try using it in tandem with the Golf mode while you’re playing to record things such as fairways hit or putts made. Toggling between different modes does not erase or interfere with the scorekeeping.

I know fairways in disc golf are a little different than ball golf, but you might be interested in keeping track with how many of your drives land in the “fairway” when you play. Think about it, have you ever really thought about what your driving accuracy was when playing? Maybe you record how many putts it took you total in a round. For those that want to increase their putting accuracy, try using the All Score mode to tally those. You could even use the All Score mode to track your Birdies in a round. Another option would be to track a friend’s score using it while you use the Golf Mode. There’s numerous possibilities here, use it to your advantage my friend.

My Experience and Final Thoughts:
I have thoroughly enjoyed the month and a half of testing I’ve put the ScoreBand® through. With its stylish, slick appearance, I wear it as my everyday watch. It’s extremely lightweight and I forget it’s even on my wrist sometimes. When playing disc golf with it, I never have to worry about not keeping a round score because my cellphone battery is low.

Don’t get me wrong, I would never give up some of my smartphone scoring apps. Because there definitely are times that I like to track lots of my stats and/or post them to social media. But like I said earlier, it’s great for people that are looking for a simple, easy way to track score without the hassle of smartphone scoring apps and keeping up with score pencils. It would make a great gift for a child too to keep score while they’re playing. If there’s one thing I would change about the ScoreBand®, is that I wish it would indicate the hole number you’re on. On a few occasions my first day testing it, I couldn’t remember if I’d recorded the hole or not. But I did hear that that feature is coming. I also read where they had custom logo printing available on the bands, sweet!

All in all, if you’re looking for a stylish, lightweight wristband watch for yourself or an athlete in your family, I would recommend looking further into the ScoreBand®. They retail for around $24.99 and can be found in Golfsmith stores, Brookstone and several other stores listed on their website www.ScoreBand.net.

IMG_3panel

The ScoreBand® even won the “Best Product Concept Award” at the 2012 PGA Merchandise Show.

Four Modes:
-TIME: Displays Hour and Minute
-ALLSCORE: Keep Score, Statistics & Counts
-GOLF: Keep Hole & Round Score
-TENNIS: Keep Game & Set Score

The ScoreBand® Features:
-Water-resistant
-Comfortable & lightweight
-Fashionably designed for everyday wear
-Available in 8 colors and 4 sizes
-Infused with negative ion emitting minerals
-Conforms to USGA/R&A rules
-Eco-friendly silicone wristband
-Comes with 1-year manufacturer’s warranty

+Read more about ScoreBand on their website, www.ScoreBand.net.
+Follow ScoreBand on Twitter @TeamScoreBand.

Please share this post!
-jt


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Track Your Putts with ProPutt!

Posted by randomtiz


Now a quality app that tracks your putting statistics!

I have a practice basket at the house that I typically set up in the backyard to practice my putting on days that I can’t get out to the course for a round. Most of us frolfers have heard the saying “Drive for Show, Putt for Dough” and that my friends, is definitely true. Like ball golf, it’s all about the short game. You might ask yourself, What types of putts am I best at? What types of putts or conditions do I need the most improvement on? Well earlier this summer I came across a new app called ProPutt. And you might just find it to be the answer to all of the questions above.

About ProPutt:
According to their website, ProPutt is:

“ProPutt gives you the ability to effectively record your putting sessions and analyze where you need improvement. This will lead to more confident shots which will allow you to shoot lower scores every time you hit the course.”

This sounded like a really cool concept so I had to give it a try. Prior to this app, you’d find me out in the backyard with a stack of putting discs [and I say “putting discs” because I’m not a fan of real putters. I put with Innova Leopards, no joke. Anyway, I digress.] and a notepad and pen recording all of my putts. It was cumbersome and I looked like a middle school gym teacher with my clipboard. An app that could actually do this makes so much more sense.

*If you’d like to follow along with the actual app, you can download it here from the iTunes App Store for $1.99
(https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/proputt/id630269889?ls=1&mt=8).

Getting Started:

IMG_1818

[Fig. 1A]

What I like about this app’s, is how easy it is to use. Large buttons for those that have clumsy fingers (like me). It has a very clean, modern look to its interface. From the home screen, you have four main options: New Session, Sessions, Analyze and Settings. Let’s start.

New Session:
Click the New Session button to get started [See Fig. 1a]. Here you’ll be able to set your variables for this putting session. I like to warm up at a closer range and then work my way back to a further distance. I’m going to start at 15′ for this demo [See Fig. 1b]. Next enter in how many putts you want the set to consist of. Since this is my warmup and I’m only putting from 15′, I’ll just start with 10 [See Fig. 1c]. It’s a nice sunny day out with a subtle breeze–light enough to not even call it windy. So I’ll check “calm” as the weather condition [See Fig. 1d]. I putt regular (as opposed to straddle putt) and I’m in my backyard, so my terrain is “flat”. There is an option to record “comebacks” as well. This is optional but it’s to track your progress on “dots” and “flushes”–which I’ll get to later. Now hit “Create”!

You’ve now created a session for 15’ (or whatever distance you chose). Within this 15’ session you created, you can add as many sets as you’d like. Lets just focus on one for now, the one we’re about to play. In the lower right corner, hit “+Add Set” [See Fig. 1e]. Now you’re ready to begin your first set.

[Fig. 1b]
[Fig. 1b]

[Fig. 1c]
[Fig. 1c]

[Fig. 1d]
[Fig. 1d]
[Fig. 1e]
[Fig. 1e]

New Set:

[Fig. 2]

[Fig. 2]

How much simpler can it get on the user experience side? This is great. You have two large choices here to record each shot. You have “dots” and “flushes”. A dot is when you hit the metal cage or above. Hitting the pole is a miss, that does not count as a dot. A flush is obviously when you make it [See Fig. 2].

TIP #1: I would recommend recording your dots. This way–especially from longer distances–you can help keep track of your improvement of metals hit. Say for example if you’re putting from a further distance such as 50′ out–where normally you’d miss most of the shots from this distance. If you were tracking dots, you would know from set to set how many more shots you hit metal on.

TIP #2: Want to speed up your set scoring? Record only the dots as you hit them. You can tally your flushes after you’ve thrown the full set because those are the ones lying in the basket. Say you might forget how many metals you hit if you try to total those at the end of the set.

Watch as you record your flushes and dots, the “Putts Remaining” counts down. Once you’ve putted all your discs for that set, click “Save” in the upper right to record your set.

Viewing your Session:
After you complete your set and save it, you’re brought to the Session screen [See Fig. 3a]. Here you can view a summary of all your sets for the session. It shows how many sets you’ve played for that particular session along with how many flushes, dots and misses you scored. It also gives you your putting average.

If you swipe to the left, you’ll see the second screen where it allows you to enter notes for that session. For this session, for example, I was using my dgNOMAD portable target. It’s important to me that I notate that in the notes section because this particular target has a much smaller diameter target area to hit. That way I can see how my accuracy percentage increases on such a tighter target area [Fig. 3b].

From this screen you can start a new set or view previous sets. If you click “Sets” in the lower left, you’ll see all sets recorded for this particular session [Fig. 3c]. It shows the flushes made, dots and misses along with a timestamp for each one.

[Fig. 3a]
[Fig. 3a]

[Fig. 3b]
[Fig. 3b]

[Fig. 3c]
[Fig. 3c]
 

It’s a Wr(app):
Overall I’ve been very pleased with the ProPutt app. I’m a very statistical person and love numbers. This app has been great for me tracking my putting statistics. I now have a better understanding from what distances I’m consistent with sinking (or nearly making) putts and in what conditions. I really like how easy it is to use and tracking my progress. I find myself out in the backyard practicing more and more using the ProPutt app by my side. The only thing I wish the app had was something that lets you record a specific disc with a set. For example, there’s several different models of discs that I putt with. I’d like to track my percentages with those different discs so I know which ones I’m more accurate with. I guess I could always put the name of the disc used in the notes section for each session and label it according to which set I used what disc.. I may just be overcomplicating things. If you’d like to improve your putting by learning which types of shots you’re more accurate from in certain conditions, I would definitely recommend this app. Thank you @ProPutApp for a well-made app!

You can download it here from the iTunes App Store for $1.99 (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/proputt/id630269889?ls=1&mt=8).
For more info on ProPutt, check out their website here.
Thanks!

-jt


dgNOMAD New Logo & Glow Chains!

Posted by dgnomad


ImageThis won’t be news to any of you who know JT here at Dogleg DG, but I’d like to let the rest of the world know that his design came out on top in the search for dgNOMAD’s new logo, and we think it rocks! Thanks also to everyone else who sent drawings, there were several contenders.

If you need need any logo or promotional work done you can stop looking, JT did an excellent job for us. From concept to revisions to final drafts, as well as staying in touch and putting up with my busy schedule, he was on top of it all. The new logo looks awesome printed in black on our red carry bags, and the color version does a great job displaying the “UV-ness” (JT coins terms as well as designs logos!) of our newest product, retrofit Glow Chains. Our Glow Chains snap easily to any existing basket or target in under a minute and give glow golf a whole new meaning! Check them out here .

And speaking of Glow Chains, if you’re in western Pennsylvania or Northeast Ohio you can see them in action at Young’s Run DGC during Valley DGA’s Glow Throw! The first of the monthly events is May 10th, check in a 7:00 for the first 9 and after dark the Glow Chains are coming out for the next 9! If you miss this one try back, there’s one every month May to November. More info at ValleyDGA.com or email info@valleydga.com.

Trevor at Valley DGA has done a great job helping spread the word on our new chains to some neighboring clubs, anyone else who is interested in a club purchase for glow leagues or tournaments (or just to get a discount!) should definitely let me know. Club orders get 10% discounts and free shipping, email club@dgNOMAD.com for details.

Last but not least, there’s still a week left before our next drawing, register to win either a set of dgNOMAD Glow Chains or one of our revolutionary ultralight portable NOMAD Disc Golf Targets! These little guys are under 3 pounds, available in 6 standard and 4 Glow colors, and let you take a target places you never thought possible…toss one in your backpack, on your dash, or even on your bike handlebars and you can throw anywhere! They have regulation size target zones, and in fact are the only PDGA approved Object Targets on the market. In addition to being made in the USA, our targets are economical so you can grab one for yourself and give the kids their own!

Enter the drawing for free stuff here.

Thanks for checking out our new product!

Jeff@dgNOMAD.com

 

 


Prodigy First Run D1/D4 Full Review by JT

Posted by randomtiz


Alright guys, today I would like to take a moment and offer a more in-depth review of the latest Prodigy D1 and D4 “First Run” stamp discs.

Earlier in February, fellow Doglegger Jeremiah wrote a review on the Prodigy D1 and D4 “Proto” stamp discs here on the blog. Since, Prodigy has released the “First Runs” about a month ago. So I wanted to elaborate on Jeremiah’s review with a more in-depth look for the newly tweaked “First Runs”. In this review I will cover such characteristics as grip, look and feel, flight patterns and more. I would like to include several vid clips and pics below in the article that we took while testing these two discs out.

Let me preface this by stating that before I write any disc reviews, I will always take the disc out on the course multiple rounds and play several weeks with it first. I also normally test the disc at a few different local courses as well. This helps me get a better understanding of how the disc reacts in different weather conditions as well as terrain—whether it be open fields or tighter, wooded courses. I want my reviews to be fair, honest and from my perspective. Keep in mind this review is solely my opinion and does not necessarily reflect the same opinions of other Dogleggers.

The Discs:
About a month ago, I got a hold of both the new Prodigy D1 and D4 “First Run” discs from InfiniteDiscs.com. I was extremely ecstatic the day both arrived in the mail! I was like a kid in a candy shop. The wait was over. Ever since the D1/D4’s release, I had heard nothing but great things about Prodigy discs. I felt like I just had to have a piece of disc golf history (well I’d like to think anyway). Friends had told me the discs felt like no other plastic out on the market and even adding 20-30 feet to their drives. Seriously? A new brand of disc could do that? I was slightly gullible, so of course I was going to give them a try!

prodigy_firstrun Upon pulling the brand new discs out of the box, I instantly noticed a completely different feel to the plastic. A grippy coating unlike any other I had seen before—which I liked already. Now don’t get me wrong, I’m still not falling for any hype until I tested it myself. Let’s do this…[time-lapse]

Over the past four weeks I’ve thrown and tested out both Prodigy D1 and D4’s. I have finally gathered enough observations to give it a fair review. Daylight Savings Time had not yet switched over yet when I received the discs which meant it was dark already after I got off work each day. Ugh I hated it getting dark so early. I remember being antsy that entire week until the weekend rolled around before I could play. Finally, I could actually make it out during daylight hours to test them.

The Grip:
As I mentioned earlier, I was drawn to Prodigy’s grip right away. It has a solid firm feel with a good amount of grip on it. It seems like it would be a slippery disc with its translucent appearance. Innova Pro Katanas have been my go-to driver for the last three years. I love the Katana’s feel and the wider-rimmed edges which fit nicely in my long fingers. I was surprised to find that both of the Prodigy’s have a wide rim as well (According to Infinite Disc’s website, the Prodigy’s rim width is 2.3cm compared to the Katana’s 2.5cm). Could one of the Prodigy’s become my go-to replacement?

Prodigy is calling the grip on these two discs the 400 series. According to Prodigy’s website,

“The 400 series is a premium blend of material that is extremely durable. The unique blend of plastics feels as good as it looks and will be able to be broken in over time. This tour quality plastic gives the thrower better grip even when it is wet.”

A lot of high-speed discs are flatter and have sharper outside edges. Sometimes this sharpness can cut into your tightly curled fingers upon release..which sucks. But neither Prodigy did. Both of the Prodigy discs felt very comfortable with my grip (modified Split Power/Fork grip). The slightly taller height of the disc—compared to the Katana—helped it fit better and tighter in my hand. It also seemed to make it feel less sharp on that outer edge. Both discs are made up of a firm, very durable, high-performance plastic that feels great, but can it fly?

The Flight:
First course test: Alexander Park DGC, Hole #3 (FYI, all Prodigy discs are stamped just up the road from this course at Disc Stalker.)
First disc up: Prodigy D1
Weather conditions: Overcast, mid-30s with 15-20 mph winds

The D1 is Prodigy’s very fast, overstable distance driver recommended for advanced players and power throwers alike. Infinite Discs rates this disc’s flight characteristics as 13|6|0|3.

The D4 is Prodigy’s most understable disc in their line. It is still a high-speed disc and not as understable as one might think. Don’t be fooled by its “understable” label. It is a serious disc that players of all skill level will enjoy. It flies extremely far and has lots of glide. Infinite Discs rates the D4’s flight characteristics as 13|6|-3|2.

OK, so my first throw with the D1 was terrible I will admit. Ha of course I’ll blame it on the wind all day, but it did soar out of my hand and straight into the treeline as a wind pocket lifted it high and right. The D1 is not a beginner-level disc by any means and does require a good bit of arm to get it to plane out like it’s designed too. I didn’t put near enough power into that one, so we’ll try again next hole.

The D4 is a lot more understable and seemed to us much easier to throw at first than the D1 did. Destin had the first throw with the D1 and actually did pretty well with it. You can see him in action on the short clip below on Hole #3 at Alexander Park. Listen to the wind in the clip; it was mid-30s with 15-20 mph winds that day.

It took me a while—even a few weeks later—before I could really get down the release throwing the D1. I kept switching up between the D1 and the D4 for much of the first round trying to figure which disc best suited my throwing style. I agreed with Destin that first round and more so favored the D4. It wasn’t as difficult to throw, but again it could have been a combination of several factors including the huge wind gusts, cold fingers and first time throwing the discs. I wasn’t going to give up on it though, I was going to figure this disc out one way or another.

As the day went on, I found myself leaning more towards the D4 with its subtle S-curve. The D4 felt more comfortable in my hand pressed against my fingers. The D1 seems to have more on an inner bead which had a bit rougher inner lip compared to the D1. That day I just couldn’t throw the D1 hard enough to get it to turn at a high enough rate of speed. It had a tighter fairway shot accompanied with a mean hook at the end which resulted in a big skip gaining me another 20 feet or so. It wasn’t until Hole #11 until I caught my break with the D4 (and longest drive I had all day) on a big shot down to the basket. You can hear the gusty winds in the background.

After a miserably cold and windy round, I still wasn’t completely satisfied that I had given the Prodigy discs a fair chance. I needed more practice, less wind and different playing conditions. Over a few more weekends worth of play, we tested the discs at Sequoyah Park, Oregon Park and Wills Park to help complete our review. The video below was taken on Hole #4 at Wills. Here I’m throwing the Prodigy D1. Now the D1 I had struggled with from the beginning because I couldn’t get enough arm behind my throw. After throwing it numerous times during several rounds, I finally figured out how I could tweak my own throw to compensate for its flight pattern. I loved its S-curve flight and big skip at the end. You can’t tell from the video, but the disc hits on the left side of the fairway and skips huge towards the basket. Not realizing how good of a shot it actually was, I was quite shocked when we approached the basket to find it lying about 10-ft past it on the bank. Yeaaa!

[Continue reading after the jump. You won’t want to miss =)]

WP4_prodigyD4
My throw lands around 10-ft from the basket on the bank. Overshot it.

WP4_prodigyd1 Destin teeing off with the D4 on the same hole.

WP4_prodigyd1jt Me with the D1 again (still frame from the video above).

WP6_prodigyd4 Destin on Hole #6 giving the D4 all he has haha.

Final Thoughts:
D1: This disc is not for beginners nor slow throwers.. It takes a lot of arm to really power this bad boy. Designed for power throwers, it has mad consistency in the wind and stays true to its path. I found that I could keep this disc’s flight a lot more level than the D4’s. Play the hook at the end to your advantage. Place it to where you can gain from the skip at the end. Although not a fav of mine out of the box, it has now become my preferred Prodigy driver. It took weeks of practice, but I have adjusted my grip and throw to compensate for this very fast, strong driver. This disc has replaced a few other long-time drivers in my bag and is battling for top spot against my seasoned Pro Katana.

D4: Don’t be fooled by this disc’s “understable” label. It’s questionable if that at all. This disc is much easier to throw than the D1, but I still would not call this a beginner disc. It, like the D1, is a Speed 13 driver which means it’s very fast and requires an advanced arm to huck it right. It has a beautiful S-curve and I love to watch this thing sail. It has a comfortable grip and releases with ease. I’m a fan of the high-vis yellow color too as it makes this a good disc for late afternoon/sunset play. If I’ve got a little more room to play with on a fairway, I’ll reach for this driver. You’ll find this disc as well in my bag at all times.

Unless you’re a power thrower, I would try the D4 first in a weight that is close to what you normally throw. Both of these discs I have been very pleased with thus far in the month that I’ve had them. Haha now I don’t have big arms by any means, but I do throw hard. If you have the power arm to control these, hands down they’ll add a good bit more distance to your drives. Depending on the hole, I’ve noticed an average of 20-50 ft added onto my drives. Earlier this eve after work at Oregon Park, I threw my first ever 350+ drive with the D1. The glide and s-curve on it was amazing. And too, I’ve hit a few trees with them already and still show no signs of nicks or cuts into the plastic. Solid made. I truly think Prodigy has indeed put out a high quality product that was well worth the wait. No wonder some of disc golf’s top pros have left their previous sponsors to join Team Prodigy. I look forward to their midrange Spring release!

Where to Buy! (promo code):
You can click here to purchase the D1, or click here to purchase the D4. *Right now they’re giving our readers a discount on their orders which include a Prodigy disc – so be sure to use code “DogLegDG” when you checkout!

Thanks for reading and go buy you a Prodigy today!

-jt


Course Guide: Jones West, Emporia, KS

Posted by mleefry


I’m really excited to share with you all the first of many photo-based course guides I plan on creating.  I got the idea to start these when I realized that many members of the Dogleg community would not have the opportunity to practice the courses for Amateur Worlds until they arrived for the competition.  Since Columbia (my hometown) is only 3.5 hours away and St. Louis (where I go to school) is only 5 hours away, I figured I was in a great position to help non-Midwestern disc golfers prepare for such a big event.

But, making a trip to Emporia was easier said than done.  I sat on the idea for a month or two before Adam and I decided Valentine’s Day weekend would be the best time for us to take a disc golf trip.  (Jealous?  Refer to my last post: Love Is In The Air.)  After a few near-death experiences caused by our failure to realize that some highways outside of Kansas City were icy, we made it safely to my first Emporia course:  Jones West.

According to Disc Golf Course Review, Jones West, an 18-hole par-54 course, was established in 1989.  The topography has some gentle hills, but is mostly flat.  After all, it is Kansas we’re talking about!  Trees—ranging from broad and branchy evergreens to skinny deciduous trunks—definitely factor into the strategy on this course, but not to the degree that it creates the feeling of playing in the woods.  There are two ponds on the course, which create water hazards on 5 holes.  Each hole has two different pin placements, red and blue, for the Mach 3 baskets.  (For more info:  http://www.dgcoursereview.com/course.php?id=1403)

As with most other Midwestern courses, the difficulty will vary with different weather and seasonal conditions.  Wind wasn’t a huge factor the day we played, but I’ve heard it can be pretty extreme in Emporia (there was a tornado nearby during the weekend of the Glass Blown Open last year).  The seasonal changes to the course will be a little more predictable.  Just like anywhere else, in spring and summer trees will be thicker and have more leaves; in the fall and winter they’ll thin out and leave more gaps.  The size of the ponds will change depending on precipitation in the days and weeks before.  This will cause the water hazards to be more or less extreme on some holes.  (The water was pretty low when I took these pictures; there was a drought last summer, and the heavy snow didn’t hit until a few weeks later.)

After playing the course, we swung by the Dynamic Discs store and talked with Adam Searle.  He said that all of the courses in the area will be getting new tee signs before hosting Am Worlds.  (The ones they have at Jones West now are pretty nice, but several have been vandalized.  I edited most of the vandalism out in my pictures.)  As of my correspondence with Dynamic Discs on Thursday, I learned that Jones West will not be used for the Glass Blown Open this year, but it will be for Am Worlds.  They are in the process of finalizing which pin placements will be used for the tournament.

Image

Now that I have all the details out of the way, enjoy the pictures!

Image

Hole #1:  We played this hole in the red placement.  For those of you who have played at Jones before, you may notice that the giant tree in the middle of the fairway (the one on the tee sign) is no longer there, which makes the hole play out a lot easier.  Water shouldn’t affect you on this hole, even though it can be seen on the tee sign.  Scores: Emily 4, Adam 3

Image

Hole #2:  We played this hole in the red placement.  The road on the left is OB.  Scores:  Emily 5, Adam 2

Image

Hole #3:  We played this in the blue placement.  Righties, beware of the road that runs down the left of the fairway, it’s OB!  Scores:  Emily 5, Adam 4

Image

Hole #4:  We played this hole in the blue placement.  The fairway is gently sloped downhill.  When the pin is in the red placement, water may come into play.  Scores: Emily 7, Adam 3

Image

Hole #5:  We played this in the red placement.  Scores: Emily 4, Adam 5

Image

Hole #6:  Based on the pictures I took, I can’t remember which placement this hole was in.  Tee for this hole is right up next to the edge of the pond, whose width will vary depending on rainfall.  I didn’t quite have the distance or confidence to go across, so I played around it.  The top center picture shows the view from the pad.  The far right picture looks back at the pad from across the pond.  The picture across the bottom shows the length of the pond; you can see the tee pad on the left.  Scores: Emily 7, Adam 4

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Hole #7:  We played this in the red placement.  I didn’t get any pictures of this one because I ended up in the water (which shouldn’t typically happen for lefties, but I kept griplocking REALLY badly).  Water will come into play though for right-handed hyzer shots if they go too long.  Scores: Emily 5, Adam 3

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Hole #8:  We played this in the red placement.  Scores: Emily 6, Adam 3

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Hole #9:  We played this in the red placement.  The fairway is slightly downhill overall, with a drainage creek running across it.  There is a cluster of skinny trees surrounding the tee pad, and a few larger evergreens guarding the basket.  Scores: Emily 5, Adam 4

Image

Hole #10:  We played this in the blue placement.  The big tree on the tee sign that used to be in the fairway is gone.  It previously played as a mando, so the shot to the basket is significantly more open than it has been in the past.  Scores: Emily 5, Adam 3

Image

Hole #11:  We played this in the blue placement.  The fairway curves to the left for both placements.  The green slopes down then back up, creating a bit of a valley.  Scores: Emily 5, Adam 5

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Hole #12:  We played this in the red placement.  The right side of the fairway is lined with trees; the left side is relatively open.  The basket is within the treeline on the right, and is surrounded by trees on 3 sides.  Scores: Emily 6, Adam 3

Image

Hole #13:  We played this in the red placement.  The road on the right is OB.  You can see that it is roped off on the edge of the pictures; the ropes are a few feet from the edge of the road.  Scores: Emily 4, Adam 3

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Hole #14:  We played this in the red placement.  The basket is tucked between two evergreen trees, and behind a smaller tree.  Scores: Emily 3, Adam 3

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Hole #15:  We played this in the blue placement.  The road on the right of the hole is OB.  Past the evergreens on the left is wide open, in the event a shot doesn’t land in the fairway.  Scores: Emily 5, Adam 3

Image

Hole #16:  We played this in the blue placement.  I didn’t get any pictures of this hole because, for me, it was long and frustrating, and Adam’s shot didn’t turn over and landed in someone’s yard across the road.  Whoops!  Scores: Emily 9, Adam 3

Image

Hole #17:  We played this in the red placement.  There is OB on both sides of the fairway (road on the right, houses on the left).  Water comes into play for the blue placement, but not the red.  Scores: Emily 5, Adam 3

Image

Hole #18:  We played this in a special placement that is usually used for Hole #1; it goes all the way across the pond and rests on the edge instead of being on the left side of it, as is seen in the red and blue placements.  You can see the basket from the tee in the top picture, where it is to the right of the brown trees.  The water makes this placement especially difficult.  We learned from experience that, if faced with a difficult putt, it is vital to throw a shot that will not roll if it hits the ground.  I ended up 50+ feet from the basket more than once on a roll.  Also, for the blue placement, it may be important to know that the road is OB behind the tree line.  Scores: Emily 11, Adam 4


Our One Disc Challenge

Posted by randomtiz


The Intro:
A few weeks ago fellow Doglegger, Destin, casually mentioned that we should battle in a “one” disc round at one of the local parks sometime soon. I had heard of people playing rounds with one disc before, but just the thought of being limited to only one disc did not sound fun to me. Even though I don’t carry a plethora of discs, I do like having options for different shot types I encounter. I’m always up for a fun, friendly competition so I took Destin up on the challenge.

What disc should I actually choose?
I wouldn’t say that there’s one disc in my bag that I would truly consider my all-around go-to disc. I do have a few that I throw often for multiple shot types, but never considered them for every single shot. I figured I could at least choose from some of those as a starting point. I knew we had at least one normal full round before the challenge, so I would take that opportunity to test some of those discs out.

The Discs:
Some of the discs I tried out were my beat Innova Leopard, Discraft Zombee (2012 Ace Race disc), Discraft Buzzz, and my new MVP Vector. Here’s my little background history for each of the above mentioned discs:

Innova DX Leopard (weight = ~171g) – This is the oldest disc that I have. I’ve used this disc for several years now and have carried it in my bag ever since. If you guys have been following my posts, you know that I mention this disc a lot and actually putt with this thing instead of a true putter. From several years of throwing it, I seem to know its exact flight path for approach/putting. I’ll use it for anything under 150. It has become very understable over the years—especially at high speeds, so teeing off with this thing is out of the question. I also use this disc if I’m in the woods and need a good anhyzer disc to get around trees. This beat Leo has a wonderful, big s-curve at short distances when thrown at an anny.

Discraft Z-line Zombee (weight = 175-176g) – The first time playing with this disc was at my first Ace Race last summer. This 2012 Discraft Ace Race disc was recently named the Zombee. I immediately fell in love with this straight-gliding shooter with small fade at the end. It has a shallow rim and is cupped out making it easier to rest a finger on the outside of the grooved rim. This disc can really hold its line for me when thrown hard enough and finishes with a nice slight fade at the end. The longest approach/putt shot I’ve ever hit was made with this disc a few months ago at around ~125 ft. Still [knock on wood] no Ace to date, but the closest I’ve ever came to one was also with this disc from around ~180 ft that hit the center post and bounced back out of the front of the chains, AHH! During a normal round, this is my go-to midrange for shots 100-230 ft or so. I’ve never teed off with this disc on a hole further than 250, so not sure how well it flies at max potential/speed. I haven’t really found anything I dislike about this disc so far.

Discraft X Buzzz (weight = 175g) – I’ve heard and read rave reviews on Discraft’s line of Buzzzs, so I just had to get one and try it out. I got a great deal on one off eBay several months back. I’ve heard how well they hold their line and overall how great a midrange disc they are. I will break this disc out every once in awhile, but I’ll be honest and say that I still haven’t quite figured out its best characteristic. Maybe I should just use it more often to really give it a chance. I tend more to use this disc in practice or for ‘gimme’ shots when my game’s not on the line. But with having used that beat Leo and Zombee for most shots under 200, I haven’t found a good enough reason to switch to the Buzzz full-time yet. I am sure it really is a great disc though; I just need more practice with it. It does feel great in-hand and has that solid, sturdy feel to it.

MVP Vector (weight = 176g) – This is the newest disc in my arsenal and has already found a permanent spot in my bag. For a midrange, I can throw this bad boy further than any other midrange disc I own. I don’t know if you know, but MVP discs supposedly have GYRO™ technology which gives its flight path a more stable/balanced, accurate and consistent glide. The Vector is slightly overstable making it more wind resistance. I was surprised at the results the first day I took this disc to the course, for a midrange. If thrown at a little harder speed, it has a very long glide and little fade at the end. Depending on the type of terrain you’re playing, the Vector’s “grippy” rubber-like edge could prove beneficial. I find this disc to have less of a skip and more of a “magnetic” stop when it hits. It seems to grip better to the ground—great for approaches/putts.

The Fan Poll:
These four discs had their advantages and disadvantages on the course that day, so I was still unable to fully commit to any one disc right away. I thought to myself, Do I go with a driver that can get me further distances off the pad, but then suffer on putts because it’s overstable? or Do I go with a midrange and get less tee distance but comes with better chances of sinking approaches and putts? Ahh the decisions. So here’s what I did. I turned to our awesome fanbase (you guys) on both our @DoglegDiscGolf Twitter and Dogleg Facebook and posed the question, “If you had to play a full 18-hole round with only ONE disc, what type of disc would it be?” We received a lot of great response and I want to thank you guys for that! Here’s some of the responses…

Facebook Feedback:

Billy T. – Discraft XS
Trey P. – If the course is long a mid-range, Buzz. If the course is mostly shorter holes I’ve had success throwing my putter.
Manuel L. – A echo star boss
Dylan C. – Glow aviar putter!
Justin A. – MVP vector
Aaron M. – flat dx roc
Tommy J. – Valkyrie or a buzzz
Destin W. – Zombee!! (2012 Ace Race Disc)
Oscar J. – 173 medium neutron Ion – Yellow Green – my name and number on inside rim.
Alan M. – Boss 136g
Robert T. – i would use my trusty discraft buzz
Jeremiah B. – Definitely a Roc.

Twitter Feed:

@WolfPackDiscs – DX viper #innova #discgolf played many one disc challenges with it
@Restonification – Z Buzz. What else is there?
@MCW7979 – From what’s in my bag right now, my Star TeeBird.
@captain_jager – simple that would be a crisp wraith. You can do anything with that disc.
@BigAppleachia – My Lat64 AirSaint147. Its a driver w/glide does anything a mid can, and putts too! #discgolf
@Delt_Nikolas – Ti Buzzz. Buttery smooth.

Challenge Day:
The challenge day was finally here. This past Saturday, we met up at Oregon Park. It’s early afternoon and the temp’s barely breaking 40 (we live in the South now). Wind conditions looking less than favorable and peaking at 15-20+ mph wind gusts. Not exactly my ideal conditions for a first time, one-disc challenge. But lets do this!

After all the feedback from our followers, I decided to go with the one disc that received the most votes—the Buzzz. Heck I’ll give it a shot. My choice: 175g Discraft Buzzz, Destin’s choice: 169g Innova Star TL.
onedisc-both

For this one-disc round, we moved up to the shorter pads to better our Ace chances with the unruly wind conditions. I think we both had a rough start getting use to just throwing one disc and unsuccessfully controlling its inconsistent flight paths in the wind. Hole #1 was a downhill shot, which was a great way to start any round. Those downhill shots build confidence in your throws when you can easily go yard off the pad. Once we got past the first three holes out in the open, the course takes a turn for the woods. Shielded by tree lines from the wind, I did much better with my drives from there on out. The likeability of the Buzzz was growing on me when the wind no longer became a major factor. I was finally figuring out how to hold it and throw it further and further with a few minor hand adjustments.

Gotta love Georgia Pines…always making a mess and leaving tight shots. onedisc-OP16

“Needle”ss to say, it was a tight race throughout the round. Destin was on a high for beating me for the first time ever earlier that morning in a normal round. We were neck and neck until he birdied one late in the round, going one up. Then it came down to the final hole. Uphill into the crosswind. All I needed was a birdie and I could have tied it up…or he bogey..or even double. Nope, he got the best of that wind on that last hole. We both layed up close to the basket leaving for a short par toss each. Well-played Destin, well-played. [Below] Destin acting estactic as he pulled off back-to-back wins that day on me. First for both haha. Besides the wind, had a great day overall. Fun times. I call rematch.

onedisc-winning

Feel free to comment below with your One-Disc Challenge experiences and/or your favorite all-around discs. Enjoy! —jt


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dgNOMAD Glow Chains/Portable Disc Golf Glow Target Review by JT

Posted by randomtiz


Good evening!

Do you enjoy night disc golf? Have you ever wanted to get into night disc golf? Or do you simply wish you just had a super lightweight practice target that you could easily tote around and set up in minutes?

Just about everyone could use some practice on their short-game, right?

Well I might just have an idea—or solution if you will—if you answered “yes” to any of the above questions.

A few weeks ago I posted a teaser video for this upcoming review here on the blog. Let me just preface this by saying the filming of this 13 minute video review took longer than anticipated to cut, edit and produce the music track in it. But several weeks later and many late nights put into it, I can proudly say IT’S FINISHED!

Just in case you missed the teaser, the guys at dgNOMAD were grateful enough to send a set of their new UV Glow Chains for us to review right here on Dogleg. While I was at it, I also bought one of their Ultralight Portable UV Disc Golf Glow Targets to include in the review as well. Both of these products are awesome I must say!

OK enough of the suspense already, just watch the video review!

Once again, special thanks to Jeff at dgNOMAD for hooking us up and a BIG thanks to fellow Doglegger Justin for filming and producing this video. You guys rock!

To get your very own dgNOMAD Glow Chains or dgNOMAD Ultralight Portable Disc Golf Target, check them out at dgNOMAD.com. Tell them DoglegDiscGolf sent you! =)

-jt


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Prodigy D1 & D4 Review

Posted by alphagenerator


Image I will use the post to drive more user feedback. Take my brief review with a grain of salt, as I was forced to play with my non-dominant hand… still recovering from shoulder surgery.

Image

Most, if not all, proto D1 & D4 discs currently come in max weight. The D1 is meant to be very fast and over stable, without the dreaded meat hook at the end. The flight path was narrowed significantly… reducing the side-to-side travel down the fairway.   The inner lip has been rounded as part of Prodigy’s patented Easy Release Technology. The easy release is meant to reduce both grip lock and blisters. (Soap Box Rant:  Innova’s most recent production of discs (late 2012) has a micro-bead on the inner lip that is extremely sharp and difficult to release.)

I am consistently getting more distance (20-40 ft) on every throw with both the D1 and D4. The D1 flies over stable, as intended. Prodigy claims the D1 flies well into a headwind as it does with a tailwind. I have yet to play in these conditions.

Image

The D4 is designed as a very fast, under stable driver. In my experience, this disc is not under stable. I would actually classify it as slightly over stable. Obviously, I am not getting a solid pop on my release, but I was expecting something along the lines of a fast Innova Roadrunner or Mamba (Definitely not the case).  I figure a 150 class disc will make the D4’s alleged under stability more apparent.

Overall I am happy with the purchase and look forward to throwing more Prodigy plastic. Both of these discs throw very well and get max-d with every toss.

What are your comments / reviews?

– Jeremiah


Golden Retriever, Not Always a Man’s Best Friend

Posted by randomtiz


Golden Retriever
Today I’m reviewing the “Golden Retriever” by Disc Diver. I bought a “Golden Retriever” about two years ago after I started losing more and more discs to ponds and lakes on disc golf courses that I was frequenting at the time. Reality is, losing discs suck. Especially on repeated occasions, because plastic “ain’t” cheap. I had even switched to discs such as Innova Dragon’s that float, but their super light 150g weight severely affected my distance from the box.

After multiple attempts with sticks, fishing rods and the occasional “swim” for a disc, I got tired of trudging through  algae-infested mud-ridden ponds retrieving my weary discs. I knew there had to be a better alternative to fish out discs without having to actually swim with them in hopes to find my sunken disc and not catch some disease…

Then I found Disc Diver’s “Golden Retriever” and what seemed to be a clever invention–a disc retriever for discs sunken in the water. I watched the video on their site and was immediately sold. (Currently ~$25-30 on several disc golf websites out there.) I had just lost two discs a week earlier, so I was ecstatic about getting this thing in the mail. Almost considered rush shipping because I wanted those discs back that bad. Seems like a handy tool to frolfers everywhere, right? I’ll let you be the judge of that.

First you might ask What exactly is the Golden Retriever or How does the Golden Retriever work?

According to their website, DiscDiver.com, it is a fold-able device that’s “designed to retrieve sunken golf discs from the bottom of water hazards. It only takes a few seconds and is exceptionally easy to operate. The Discdiver ‘Golden Retriever’ is small enough to fit in any disc bag or back pocket.”

  • Simply tug on the Golden Retriever’s throw rope to unfold it.
  • Then toss it beyond the golf disc and pull across to retrieve.
  • As it skims across the bottom of the hazard, it will scoop and retain the disc.

Seems easy, right? The concept of it is, yes, a fact very easy. Actually successfully throwing it and retrieving the disc? Not so much. Now let me explain; and this is why I named this post the way I did.

The Disc Diver “Golden Retriever” only successfully works under very specific conditions. If you watch the video on their site and notice, you can clearly see the disc sunken in the bottom of a shallow creek. The “Golden Retriever” works really when you can actually see your disc. I don’t know about you guys, but the ponds and lakes around here are both murky and have muddy bottoms. You’re S.O.L. trying to use one of these things around here as you throw blind into the water. The “Golden Retriever’s” back bar frame is barely as wide as the disc itself. With that said, you must have the “Golden Retriever” lined up almost perfectly behind the disc as you drag it over it. Just think if you can’t even see the disc?! Now you understand.

The goal is to throw it so it lands behind your disc. Let it hit the bottom, then carefully drag it towards you as you pull on the supplied 15-30 ft. line (TIP: Make damn sure you have the other end of your line tied to your body or bag. I’ve thrown the whole thing—line and all—into a pond before and spent another 30 min trying to retrieve that too!). As the “Golden Retriever” approaches your disc, the lip of the frame should catch on the underside of the rim of your disc. The disc somewhat “locks” into place in the back of the frame. Don’t try to lift up on it or you might drop the disc, just keep pulling straight towards you.

retriever
But what I’m not sold on is how effective it is in a variety of scenarios. Yes, it works wonderfully in a clear body of water with a smooth ground bottom. I would simply suggest actually observing the different bodies of water around your local courses before considering one of these. Like I mentioned earlier, here in the Southeastern states—where I play most of my disc golf–ponds are very murky, have muddy bottoms that often covered with algae, slimy plant life and debris. And I’m going to be perfectly honest with you; If your local ponds have any characteristics like the aforementioned pond descriptions, I do not see this product being of any help to you. Check out this picture to the side, this is what I “retrieved” with one throw into a disc golf pond while playing in Mississippi. If the pond has any kind of grass/weeds like that, there’s no way you’re returning anything that you hoped you would be. If you’re into kelp or need weeds for your home aquarium, go for it. =)

retrieverdog
Another thing, this really only works if the bottom of the pond/lake/river is near flat. If there’s debris, large rocks, or limbs then you might be in trouble. The bottom floor needs to be near flat in order for the retriever to “scoop” up the disc. It does have a slight learning curve with getting it to fall and line up with your disc though. Don’t get me wrong, the “Golden Retriever” does have several great features as well as being super compact and portable! Its lightweight design has a high-vis color paint that helps visibility in slightly murky water. The ones I’ve seen online now actually come with up to 50 ft of line. Just keep in mind, it’s all about lining the retriever up with the sunken disc and being able to actually see the disc in the water. If these two conditions apply to your sunken disc, then you have a high chance of being able to recover your lost disc!

Honestly I’ve retrieved more of my friend’s discs than any of mine. It does work to a degree. I finally feel like I’ve gotten my money’s worth two years later. I take it with me every time I go out on the course just in case. But in most scenarios, this might not be your best friend when trouble arises.

Would love to hear anyone else’s stories and/or feedback if you own/or have ever used a Disc Diver “Golden Retriever”?

-jt


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